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In his latest book The Algebra of Happiness, author Scott Galloway puts forth some unconventional, hard-won wisdom for achieving a fulfilling career and life.

Is there a secret equation or formula for being happy? Such a thing does exist, says Scott Galloway, a successful serial entrepreneur, marketing guru and professor, in his newest book The Algebra of Happiness.

Even though he is a professor of brand strategy at New York University’s Stern School of Business, Galloway delivers lectures on not just business but also on life strategies. In the classroom, on his blog, and in YouTube videos, he regularly addresses life’s biggest questions such as, ‘What career should you choose?’; ‘How can you set yourself up for success’; ‘How can you reconcile ambition with personal growth’; and ‘What can you do now that you do not have regrets when you are 40, 50 or 80’. In The Algebra of Happiness too, Galloway examines the definitions of love, success and most importantly, of a life well lived. And he does all this by sharing anecdotes and insights about life’s challenges, poignant personal stories and all that he has observed as a serial entrepreneur, academic, husband, father, son and American citizen.

Galloway starts the book by owning that he has absolutely no academic credibility, credentials or training to advise people on how to live their lives. He then proceeds to give readers a glimpse into his life, starting from the time he was an unremarkable, skinny and awkward kid in California in the seventies. He talks about his middle-class upbringing, mediocre grades in school and college, stint in investment banking, starting several businesses (some of which were glowing successes while the rest failed), divorce by age 34, and moving to New York City and joining the faculty of Stern School. The highs and lows of his life and the struggles are what prompted Galloway to a pursuit of knowledge on how to achieve both success and happiness.

The book is divided into four meaningful sections. The first section highlights the finite number of equations for happiness that Galloway and his students review in the final lecture of his Brand Strategy course every spring. The second section outlines all that Galloway has understood about ambition, career, money and success from his experience as an investment banker, entrepreneur, professor and speaker. The third section focuses on love and relationships and how building a life with someone who loves you and who you love, near guarantees a life of reward and joy. The fourth section challenges readers to turn to themselves and address the care and feeding of their body, inner demons and last days on Earth. Ultimately, Galloway concludes that relationships are all that one has and all that matter, so one should always invest in relationships.

Whether it is about how to succeed in business, find the right partner and stay together for the long-term, be a good parent or look after one’s health, Galloway just tells it like he has seen it. His words are brutally honest and at the same time very sincere. Simply put, his book is packed with raw and vulnerable wisdom that is delivered with heart. And all this together addresses well our need for advice on how to achieve both professional success and personal fulfilment.

Brash, funny and surprisingly touching, The Algebra of Happiness should be on everyone’s reading list, especially those who are struggling to be happy or are feeling adrift. All of us can learn from Galloway’s mistakes and insights and follow some (if not all) of his powerful, hard-earned life lessons.